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#68 Mike Turk

How would you rank

Mike Turk?

  • HIGHER
  • APPROPRIATE
  • LOWER

Why Mike Turk?

Mike Turk was born in 1953, the son of a jazz bassist and vocalist. He started out playing a lot of rhythm and blues, and then in the 1960s he gravitated toward country music and sat in with folks like Bonnie Raitt and the Charlie Musselwhite Band. Discovering the possibilities of chromatic harmonica, Mike then spent two years at Berklee College of Music, where studied under Toots Thieleman and finally settled back into jazz. 

Comments (2)

  • Neil Perry Grossman

    |

    Mike and I were like brothers in the mid to late sixties. We would ride the trains in the Bronx to Manhattan and play for hours. Me, on the bones, & Mikey on harp. We were like Sonny Terry & Brownie Mcgee. Mike already sounded better than Paul Butterfield, or Taz Mahall by 1968. He was just so driven & talented. He more or less drove me crazy with his constant playing & practicing. Well it surely paid off. I remember when he discovered the chromatica and was able to play many more octaves. He was so exited and immersed in creating his style. Not only was he a great friend to me & others, but he always had my respect and admiration. I have not talked to him, or seen him since the late 70’s, but I never forgot his talent or friendship.

    Reply

    • JP Allen

      |

      Wow…great story…thanks for sharing your memories Neil. Sounds like time for a phone call. jp

      Reply

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